BREAKING NEWS Lafayette grand jury declines to indict police officers in Trayford Pellerin killing Full Story
SEVERE WX : Flood Warning View Alerts
STREAMING NOW: Watch Now

Stay Safe as Hurricane Delta Makes Landfall

As Hurricane Delta makes landfall, be sure to take precautions to keep yourself safe from the many hazards associated with high winds and flood waters.

Posted: Oct 9, 2020 2:45 PM

BATON ROUGE, La. – As Hurricane Delta makes landfall, be sure to take precautions to keep yourself safe from the many hazards associated with high winds and flood waters. Some common hazards to be aware of include flooding, flying/floating debris and downed live wires.
Flooding
Turn around, don’t drown! Do not drive through floodwaters—just one foot of water can sweep your vehicle away. Cars or other vehicles will not protect you from floodwaters.
Stay off bridges over fast-moving water.
Floodwater poses a drowning risk for everyone—regardless of your ability to swim.
Do not walk, swim, or dive through flood waters— just six inches of fast-moving water can knock you down.
There may be hazardous debris underneath the water or hazardous chemicals in the flood waters that you cannot see including:
Downed power lines;
Human/livestock waste;
Household, medical and industrial hazardous waste (chemical, biological, and radiological);
Coal ash waste that contain carcinogenic compounds such as arsenic, chromium and mercury;
Physical objects such as lumber, vehicles and debris; and
Wild or stray animals such as rodents or snakes.
Debris
Take refuge in a designated storm shelter, or an interior room to avoid potential flying debris.
If trapped in a building by flooding, go to the highest level of the building. Do not climb into a closed attic as you could be trapped by rising flood water.
Downed Power lines/live wires
Never touch a fallen power line. Call the power company to report any seen.
Do not drive through standing water if downed power lines are in the water.
Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or you are standing in water.
Finally, make sure your lines of communication stay open. Make sure your cell phones or communication devices are fully charged and save phone calls for emergencies. Phone systems are often down or busy after a disaster. Use text messages or social media to communicate with family and friends.
For the latest information on Hurricane Laura, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4559 or follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6.

Keep Your Family, Pets Safe When Using Generators After a Hurricane

BATON ROUGE, La. – As Louisiana recovers from Hurricane Laura and prepares for Hurricane Delta, FEMA urges everyone who experiences a power outage to be safe when using portable generators.
Do not use a generator inside your home, garage, basement, crawlspace or any partially enclosed area. Keep them outside of your living spaces and away from doors, windows and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come inside. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that could kill you, your family and your pets.
Be sure to check on your family and neighbors who may be using generators to remind them about the importance of keeping generators outside of their home and other enclosed spaces.
If you are using a generator for any reason, including after a hurricane, keep this information in mind to keep you and your household safe:
Place generators at least 20 feet away from your home, downwind away from open doors, windows and vents.
Turn the generator off before refueling, and allow it to cool for 15-20 minutes.
Never try to power the house wiring by plugging the generator into a wall outlet -- instead, use a heavy-duty, outdoor extension cord to plug appliances into generators.
Do not use generators in rain or wet conditions.
Place a fire extinguisher nearby.
Get a carbon monoxide monitor for your home.
Here are some resources for additional information about generators and carbon monoxide:
Watch this generator safety video from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and FEMA which includes American Sign Language: youtube.com/watch?v=n7GIOzABRHA
Read this news from the Office of Louisiana State Fire Marshal: http://sfm.dps.louisiana.gov/doc/press/pr_2020-68.pdf.
View information Occupational Safety and Health Administration information about how to use portable generators safely at osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Hurricane_Facts/portable_generator_safety.pdf.
Learn about carbon monoxide from the CDC by visiting cdc.gov/co/ or calling 800-232-4636
For the latest information on Hurricane Laura, visit www.fema.gov/disaster/4559 or follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6.

Lafayette
Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 67°
Feels Like: 83°
New Iberia
Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 81° Lo: 71°
Feels Like: 84°
Ville Platte
Partly Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 80° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 83°
Abbeville
Cloudy
81° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 73°
Feels Like: 84°
Crowley
Cloudy
81° wxIcon
Hi: 84° Lo: 68°
Feels Like: 86°
St. Martinville
Mostly Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 70°
Feels Like: 84°
Opelousas
Partly Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 67°
Feels Like: 83°
Tracking a flash flood watch

Latest Video

Image

Hemp Farming In Louisiana, Locals Helping Other Farmers Grow

Image

Meet Primrose and Brandi, Two Loveable Pups Looking For A Home

Image

HOUSE BILL 596

Image

CYT Presents Spongebob

Image

Chef Trahan: Vestal Restaurant

Image

Tracking More Stormy Times

Image

Tracking more rain coming

Image

KA Alumni Clay Shoot

Image

Laugh Your Way Into Summer With The "Summer of Comedy" Series

Image

Ranch Pickles. The New Snack Craze Circulating Social Media

Community Events